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Stroke Rehabilitation @ No Barriers Foundation

Stroke is a common condition seen by many physiotherapists, often leading to motor dysfunction and in some cases permanent disability. The rehabilitative objective of stroke patients is based on independent living by improving their functional disabilities. Therefore, rehabilitation training for stroke patients should focus on improving flexibility, muscular strength, coordination, and sense of balance to maintain an independent lifestyle through the recovery of physical functions. Rehabilitation treatment needs to be consistent and long-term.

Exoskeleton has in recent years emerged as a reliable and safe alternative to standard physiotherapy rehabilitation techniques. At the No Barriers Foundation, the exoskeleton is used to provide rehabilitation training and for walking assistance to patients affected by post-stroke disability. Lower-limb rehabilitation robots such as the Ekso GT we currently operate can help patients to carry out reasonable and effective training to improve the motor function of paralysed extremity in a safe effective manner. Exoskeleton rehabilitation allows high intensity repetitive and progressive gait training that is not achievable in many settings.

Another piece of equipment we have at our disposal is the EasyStand Glider which helps many clients in many ways. For example, in stroke survivors aids the reduction in tone while increasing joint range of motion. The EasyStand Glider features state-of-the-art active standing technology found in no other stander. Active standing provides lower body range of motion and upper body strengthening. There are several excellent research studies documenting the benefits of passive standing programs for an individual’s long-term health. The EasyStand Evolv stander allows the user to move in and out of standing without having to be lifted or transferred making it ideal for exercise in its own right but also as an adjunct to the exoskeleton training performed.

Reformer training involves low and intermediate intensity resistance and repetition that matches the patient’s physical ability and can be a remedial exercise program that can improve physical ability and influence quality of life. With hemiplegia, there is a strong tendency to shift completely to the unaffected side, which only reinforces the weakness and poor motor control of the affected side. Reformer Pilates helps to correct that.

At the No Barriers Foundation, we offer a creative rehabilitation program experience that considers both physical and mental components of rehabilitation for improving balance, strength, mobility and ability to walk when using specialist exercise therapy for recovering functions in stroke patients.

Contact us at hello@nobarriers.ie for more details

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